NDIS

&

Support

Workers

National Disability Insurance Scheme

The NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission is an independent government body that will improve the quality and safety of NDIS supports and services and strengthen the skills and knowledge of workers, providers and participants across Australia

How difficult an NDIS Support Workers Job

This job involves helping others, not being judgemental about a situation, and providing support to change lives. It can be not easy, so you’ll need skills and patience, compassion, and understanding. If you’re self-obsessed and don’t like dealing with people, this is not the job for you. If your friends are upset at stupid o clock in the morning, are you the first person they call? If you like helping others and love the thought of making a difference in a stranger’s life, then consider a career as a support worker.

Finding NDIS Support Workers

A support worker’s role involves working with vulnerable people in different ways. You could be helping people who have mental health problems, learning difficulties, disabilities, recovering addicts, young offenders, those struggling with relationships… it could be anything. No day will be the same. Some people may need emotional support to get them through a difficult time, while others require a more hands-on approach. It’s your job to analyse their needs and help draw up a unique plan.

Good NDIS Support Workers

Put; you’ll make a genuine difference to people’s lives, which is guaranteed to make you feel all happy inside. Nobody wants to be stuck in a dead-end job doing 9-5 until they retire, after all. Where’s the fun in that? Working as a support worker allows you to progress, from moving up the career ladder to earning more qualifications. If you get enough experience and study hard to make a vocational qualification or a degree, you could move up to a senior or managerial role.

NDIS Workers and Jobs analysis

This job involves helping others, not being judgemental about a situation, and providing support to change lives. It can be not easy, so you’ll need skills and patience, compassion, and understanding. If you’re self-obsessed and don’t like dealing with people, this is not the job for you. Ideal for those of you that don’t want to work a 9-5 repetitive job, some of the things you may be expected to do include: Being a good listener – A good cup of tea and a hug can do wonders, but you have to really listen and listen well in this job. One of the most critical tasks is simply being there, and listening is a massive part of the job.

Doing chores – Sounds like a simple job but doing chores around the house can be a massive help. You could do cooking, cleaning, shopping, and helping to pay bills.

Helping people live independently – Teaching life skills and assisting people to live an ordinary life will be one of your main goals as a support worker. From teaching people how to budget money and getting them involved with the community to getting them suitable housing that accommodates their needs, you’ll be there along the way to help with it all.

Family ties – You won’t just be helping vulnerable people; you’ll also be helping the people that can be forgotten, the families. Some may

struggle with their relative’s issues or need a helping hand caring for them.

Is there study involved?

If grades were never your strong point at school, don’t stress, it won’t affect your chances of being a support worker. What matters most in this job is a passion for helping people and some life experience. Any experience working in a health or support role is also good. You’ll need to show you can help people with a variety of issues and requirements and that you’ll always remain supportive,

Understanding NIDS Support Workers

Under the NDIS Commission, a worker is employed or otherwise engaged in providing NDIS supports and services to people with disability. Workers can be paid or unpaid, self-employed employees, contractors, consultants, and volunteers.
Workers will need to understand and comply with the NDIS Code of Conduct, which outlines the expected behaviour of workers, reportable incident requirements, and any additional competencies required for their role.
These obligations are explained in the Worker Orientation Module ‘Quality, Safety and You’, a 90-minute interactive online course available to assist NDIS workers to better support people with disability.
This free short course helps workers to understand:
• What the NDIS is and why we need it
• The role of the NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission
• Worker’s responsibilities under the Code of Conduct
• Worker’s roles in supporting people with disability to achieve the vision of the NDIS.
Depending on the position or job, you might need an NDIS Worker Screening Check.

The role of an NDIS disability support worker

The role of our support workers is to provide a helping hand where you need it most. Their crucial part is to help you work on your goals to increase your independence and confidence.

Responsibility of NDIS Support Workers

On a day-to-day basis, support worker duties could include helping with meal preparation, household chores, administering medication, managing finances, accessing community facilities, going shopping, meeting friends, visiting the doctors, finding a job, or providing general emotional support.

Qualification of NDIS Support Workers

To obtain a disability support worker, most organisations don’t require formal qualifications.

Such courses are:

  • Certificate IV in Disability.
  • Certificate III in Individual Support (Disability)
  • Certificate II in Community Services.

Have opportunities to make the decision of your own choice and pursue your chosen activities are limited only in the same ways that one’s non-disabled neighbours are limited 

Who is NDIS Support Workers

Under the NDIS Commission, a worker is employed or otherwise engaged in providing NDIS supports and services to people with disability. Workers can be paid or unpaid and self-employed people, employees, contractors, consultants, and volunteers.

You don’t have to go through your life struggles alone.
“Reach out today”

Your goals are the principal focus of our care. Putting you at the centre of everything we do as we live up to our name – We Love to Care

Tel: 1300-303-135    Mobile: 0422-041-421

Address: 4/390 Clergate Road, ORANGE NSW 2800

Other Locations

North Manly NSW 2100,  Sourthbank VIC 3006

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